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Category: Perform Better

high intensity interval training

Should You Train to Failure for Muscle Growth?

This is the first study to comprehensively examine the recovery time course of training to failure versus not, with matched volume. Muscle damage Metabolic markers of fatigue, an indirect marker of muscle damage, and high-, medium-, and low-load

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How To Balance Cardio And Lifting

If you want or need to add cardio to your strength training, it’s best to perform them on separate days, if your schedule allows. In this study, strength gains were similar when doing cardio immediately after strength training

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Should You Lift The Weight Slowly Or Quickly?

Under most circumstances, you should probably try to apply maximum velocity to the concentric portion of each rep. When you do so, you probably don’t need to worry about internal cues (the “mind-muscle connection”). With low (50% 1RM)

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Tapering To Boost Strength Performance

Tapering is the process of making your workouts easier for to boost performance later on; supercompensation and elicited peak performance. The average amount of improvement from a taper in the literature is 3% with an expected range of

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A girl doing pull ups

Does High Volume Training Boost Gains?

This meta-analysis compared strength gains with low and high volume training, in both trained and untrained lifters. The effect sizes for higher weekly volumes were ~20-25% larger than the effect sizes for lower weekly volumes, which means 20-25%

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Should You Work Out Many Times A Day?

In a recent study, performing the entirety of one’s strength training in a single session versus splitting it up into three sessions per training day didn’t affect gains in lean body mass, upper body strength, or upper body

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