ARE EGG YOLKS GOOD FOR BAD FOR YOU?

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Old science feared that the cholesterol in eggs would mess up blood fats and thus increase risk of heart disease, which is why many fitness freaks throw out egg yolks. Science is, however, always being updated and cholesterol is not as dangerous as once feared.

The body NEEDS cholesterol, and produces 80% of it itself in the liver. If you eat more cholesterol, the body simply balances things out by producing less. The body is, once again, smarter than you think.

After adjusting for dietary factors, a higher consumption of eggs (up to one egg per day) is not associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease or stroke in healthy men and women.

Whole eggs are full of beneficial vitamins and minerals, and contain almost every essential vitamin and mineral our bodies need to function. It is one of the few natural food sources of vitamin D and contains 7 grams of high-quality protein. Whole eggs are also full of omega-3 fatty acids and deliver many of the B vitamins — B6, B12, riboflavin, folate, and choline.

Sources:

1. Kritchevsky SB1, Kritchevsky D. Egg consumption and coronary heart disease: an epidemiologic overview. J Am Coll Nutr. 2000 Oct;19(5 Suppl):549S-555S.

2. Kritchevsky SB1.
A review of scientific research and recommendations regarding eggs. J Am Coll Nutr. 2004 Dec;23(6 Suppl):596S-600S.

3. Ying Rong.
Egg consumption and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. BMJ 2013; 346

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