Low-load training can be used to stimulate muscle growth just as effectively as high-load training. However, fatigue may persist for longer following low-load training, which could
limit training frequency and ultimately limit weekly training volume. Low-load training is a useful tool for maintaining or gaining muscle mass when high-load training is precluded, but you likely shouldn’t rely on it too heavily for your day-to-day training, except in situations where you’ll have an extra day or two to recover, or when training muscle groups for which performance doesn’t matter to you.

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Source:

Molecular, neuromuscular, and recovery responses to light versus heavy resistance exercise in young men. doi: 10.14814/phy2.13457.

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